A password authentication scheme with secure password updating www ioldating co za

21-Jul-2017 07:07

The general attack model is what's known as an offline password-guessing attack.In this scenario, the attacker gets a file of encrypted passwords from somewhere people want to authenticate to.

They included passcodes such as "k1araj0hns0n," "Sh1a-labe0uf," "Apr!

l221973," "Qbesancon321," "DG091101%," "@Yourmom69," "ilovetofunot," "windermere2313," "tmdmmj17," and "Band Geek2014." Also included in the list: "all of the lights" (yes, spaces are allowed on many sites), "i hate hackers," "allineedislove," "ilovemy Sister31," "iloveyousomuch," "Philippians," "Philippians4:6-7," and "qeadzcwrsfxv1331." "gonefishing1125" was another password Steube saw appear on his computer screen.

Seconds after it was cracked, he noted, "You won't ever find it using brute force." This is why the oft-cited XKCD scheme for generating passwords—string together individual words like "correcthorsebatterystaple"—is no longer good advice. The attacker will feed any personal information he has access to about the password creator into the password crackers.

There are commercial programs that do password cracking, sold primarily to police departments.

There are also hacker tools that do the same thing. The efficiency of password cracking depends on two largely independent things: power and efficiency. As computers have become faster, they're able to test more passwords per second; one program advertises eight million per second.

They included passcodes such as "k1araj0hns0n," "Sh1a-labe0uf," "Apr!l221973," "Qbesancon321," "DG091101%," "@Yourmom69," "ilovetofunot," "windermere2313," "tmdmmj17," and "Band Geek2014." Also included in the list: "all of the lights" (yes, spaces are allowed on many sites), "i hate hackers," "allineedislove," "ilovemy Sister31," "iloveyousomuch," "Philippians," "Philippians4:6-7," and "qeadzcwrsfxv1331." "gonefishing1125" was another password Steube saw appear on his computer screen.Seconds after it was cracked, he noted, "You won't ever find it using brute force." This is why the oft-cited XKCD scheme for generating passwords—string together individual words like "correcthorsebatterystaple"—is no longer good advice. The attacker will feed any personal information he has access to about the password creator into the password crackers.There are commercial programs that do password cracking, sold primarily to police departments.There are also hacker tools that do the same thing. The efficiency of password cracking depends on two largely independent things: power and efficiency. As computers have become faster, they're able to test more passwords per second; one program advertises eight million per second.My advice is to take a sentence and turn it into a password.