Carbon dating of bacteria

24-Jan-2017 13:13

Some of those sugars are made into long chain molecules like cellulose, which makes up most of the woody, pulpy portion of trees and plants.Carbon dioxide gas also dissolves in water, sometimes forming carbonic acid.For reasons that physics doesn’t fully understand, atoms like to have very particular ratios of neutrons to protons.If they aren’t in a happy ratio, they decay and give off particles or radiation until they are in an optimal ratio of neutrons to protons.Now, a team of researchers using special equipment at the MAX-lab in Lund, Sweden, has applied more than six different techniques to verify that tissues from inside a Cretaceous mosasaur humerus bone, which was kept in the Royal Institute of Natural Sciences of Belgium "for many years," consist of mosasaur and not microbial molecules. First, the investigators chemically removed the mineral matrix from the mosasaur bone, leaving behind the proteins and other biomolecules.Using scanning electron microscopy, they photographed what resembled actual protein fibers.If not, this would help show that the soft tissues were original to the mosasaur.But DNA falls apart even faster than collagen, and no original mosasaur DNA should be recognizable after 10,000 years.

The investigators were interested to know whether any DNA present inside the bone would be bacterial or fungal.

When researchers find a bone or artifact, how do they know how old it is?

While there are a number of answers to that question, most of which depend largely on the age and surroundings of the item, carbon dating is surely one of the most important.

This result was the same as that of a 2001 electron microscope study of mummified Using transmission electron microscopy, the investigators found that the fibers looked like recent bone proteins.

Since the concept of 70 million-year-old flesh sounds so fanciful, many evolutionists have suggested that biological material in fossils came from bacteria instead of being original tissue.

The investigators were interested to know whether any DNA present inside the bone would be bacterial or fungal.

When researchers find a bone or artifact, how do they know how old it is?

While there are a number of answers to that question, most of which depend largely on the age and surroundings of the item, carbon dating is surely one of the most important.

This result was the same as that of a 2001 electron microscope study of mummified Using transmission electron microscopy, the investigators found that the fibers looked like recent bone proteins.

Since the concept of 70 million-year-old flesh sounds so fanciful, many evolutionists have suggested that biological material in fossils came from bacteria instead of being original tissue.

Careful chemical analyses published in peer-reviewed journals concluded that original tissues—most often protein that had not mineralized—came from the buried animals' carcasses.