Clay pipe bowl dating

19-Jul-2017 11:56

A single pipe-bowl fragment was recovered from excavations at A’asu.

It is a small fragment of the upper wall and rim of the bowl mouth. The fragment incorporates a design motif consisting of upturned flames (that would have originated lower on the bowl), and a decorative band around the rim. Because the fragment is small, there is some ambiguity in the type.

A mold seam is present indicating that this piece comes from the back of the bowl (closest to the stem). Decorative molded pipe bowls like these became common after 1730 and were evolving into more elaborate forms after 1820. Though less likely, the steepness of the rear wall suggests that it might also be of several other types (10-14) that were in use between 17.

Following Oswald (1975), the morphology of this bowl fragment is suggestive of Type 13 (Thin, short bowls, flared mouth…flat spurs which after c. If the former match is correct, then the presences of a seam makes it likely that the pipe fragment was manufactured between 17.

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In either case, this artifact is the earliest known physical evidence for European contact in Samoa.

1640-1660: The size of the bowl increased slightly during this period and stems increased to between 10 and 14 inches.

The spur became rounded, perhaps to allow the bowl to rest on a table top during smoking without marring the finish of the table.

If you have any corrections, additions, or comments, please contact me.

Please note that I am not able to respond to all requests.

In either case, this artifact is the earliest known physical evidence for European contact in Samoa.

1640-1660: The size of the bowl increased slightly during this period and stems increased to between 10 and 14 inches.

The spur became rounded, perhaps to allow the bowl to rest on a table top during smoking without marring the finish of the table.

If you have any corrections, additions, or comments, please contact me.

Please note that I am not able to respond to all requests.

The design motif is also consistent with this period, matching Coleman’s (1999) “typical Napoleonic period designs” (1790-1820).