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15-Dec-2016 02:52

All persons who are mandated reporters are required, by law, to report all known or suspected cases of child abuse or neglect.It is not the job of the mandated reporter to determine whether the allegations are valid.A list of persons whose profession qualifies them as “mandated reporters” of child abuse or neglect is found in California Penal Code Section 11165.7. It includes all school/district employees, administrators, and athletic coaches.All persons hired into positions included on the list of mandated reporters are required, upon employment, to be provided with a statement, informing them that they are a mandated reporter and their obligations to report suspected cases of abuse and neglect pursuant to California Penal Code Section 11166.5.To make a report, an employee must contact an appropriate local law enforcement or county child welfare agency, listed below.

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Red flags for abuse and neglect are often identified by observing a child’s behavior at school, recognizing physical signs, and observations of dynamics during routine interactions with certain adults.

If child abuse or neglect is reasonably suspected or if a pupil shares information with a mandated reporter leading him/her to believe abuse or neglect has taken place, the report must be made.

No supervisor or administrator can impede or inhibit a report or subject the reporting person to any sanction.

One does not have to be physically present or witness the abuse to identify suspected cases of abuse, or even have definite proof that a child may be subject to child abuse or neglect.

Rather, the law requires that a person have a “reasonable suspicion” that a child has been the subject of child abuse or neglect.

Red flags for abuse and neglect are often identified by observing a child’s behavior at school, recognizing physical signs, and observations of dynamics during routine interactions with certain adults.

If child abuse or neglect is reasonably suspected or if a pupil shares information with a mandated reporter leading him/her to believe abuse or neglect has taken place, the report must be made.

No supervisor or administrator can impede or inhibit a report or subject the reporting person to any sanction.

One does not have to be physically present or witness the abuse to identify suspected cases of abuse, or even have definite proof that a child may be subject to child abuse or neglect.

Rather, the law requires that a person have a “reasonable suspicion” that a child has been the subject of child abuse or neglect.

Effective January 1, 2015, Assembly Bill 1432 (D-Gatto) requires all local educational agencies (LEAs) to train all employees each year on what they need to know in order to identify and report suspected cases of child abuse and neglect.