Silicon valley dating scene

02-Sep-2017 09:56

But why it has all but replaced a time-tested mating ritual remains a mystery.

Until we crack the courtship code, one thing's for sure: While tech isn't really the problem, it has certainly provided a solution.

The premise is simple; the practice, revolutionary.

"It's like being at a cocktail party or a coffee shop," says Tinder co-founder Justin Mateen of Tinder's way of mimicking real-life interactions. For the past week, I'd been evaluating guys on my commute (what's with all the facial hair?

Despite loads of single men, getting a date is a no-man's land. "I'd forgotten what it was like to be flirted with," says Kink and Code blogger Emma Mc Gowan, 27, who noticed it during a recent visit to New York.

It didn't help my ego that in January, Marie Claire pinpointed our fair city as one of the top five "great places for single girls." After attempting almost comical displays of "approachability" that have to be seen to be believed (trust me), I acknowledged the sobering truth: The courtship culture in San Francisco is not normal.

After a 30-second setup that pulls photos and basic stats from a user's Facebook profile, users scroll other Tinderites filtered by age, gender and geographic proximity.

With each profile, you can see shared friends and interests, browse photos and swipe left for "no," right for "yes." When two people say "yes" to each other, the magic happens: You're given the power to chat.

This shortage of competition caused the average woman to have a ton of guys chasing after her, which naturally led her to think that it must be because she was well…pretty hot.

And thus, her standard of seeking her ideal partner then became someone who was not only rich but also charming, smart, funny, kind, liked to watch romcoms, and looked like George Clooney. Truthfully, while most may think that this “49er Syndrome” only affects young women, don’t be surprised when I tell you that it affects most men in the Bay Area as well.

It didn't help my ego that in January, Marie Claire pinpointed our fair city as one of the top five "great places for single girls." After attempting almost comical displays of "approachability" that have to be seen to be believed (trust me), I acknowledged the sobering truth: The courtship culture in San Francisco is not normal.

After a 30-second setup that pulls photos and basic stats from a user's Facebook profile, users scroll other Tinderites filtered by age, gender and geographic proximity.

With each profile, you can see shared friends and interests, browse photos and swipe left for "no," right for "yes." When two people say "yes" to each other, the magic happens: You're given the power to chat.

This shortage of competition caused the average woman to have a ton of guys chasing after her, which naturally led her to think that it must be because she was well…pretty hot.

And thus, her standard of seeking her ideal partner then became someone who was not only rich but also charming, smart, funny, kind, liked to watch romcoms, and looked like George Clooney. Truthfully, while most may think that this “49er Syndrome” only affects young women, don’t be surprised when I tell you that it affects most men in the Bay Area as well.

Because of their monetary success, they have the ability to lavishly spend on dates with young ladies (sometimes even half their age) who…truthfully…are often just temporarily in it for the money. At Three Day Rule, I ask all my clients what they are looking for in their ideal partner.