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06-Jul-2017 15:35

Picard: There are many parts of my youth that I'm not proud of...

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(The writers also shield her from the easiest Mary Sue accusations by giving her some deep and apparent flaws, rather than letting her be the perfect quasi-sibling of Spock we just never met before.) She’s also the first franchise main character of any series to not be in command of everyone else (Sisko didn’t make captain for several seasons, but he was in charge of tropes and leaves her in the dark about some of the bigger picture that a captain would be privy to.

The abrupt shifts in the story make some of the supporting players harder to know early on, though frequent Guillermo del Toro collaborator Doug Jones makes a fine impression as science officer Saru, who comes from an alien livestock race bred by their masters for one reason only: “To sense the coming of death.” Some are given quirks that are still being refined (Mary Wiseman plays an anxious cadet who refers to having “special needs,” but in the early stages this just manifests as her snoring and having a few allergies), while others like Captain Georgiou and Gabriel Lorca (Jason Isaacs) — an officer who takes an interest in Michael’s skills — are asked to lean on the thankfully sturdy screen presence of the actors playing them.

But the story and premise go through so many twists and turns throughout the first three episodes, it’s hard to predict what exactly the series is, or how much of that potential it’s capable of realizing.

The series is set in the original timeline, about 10 years before the events of the ’60s show.

The original series created modern sci-fi fan culture, spawned movies, books (both tie-in novels and supplementary texts, like starship blueprints or Klingon-English dictionaries), spinoffs, more spinoffs, and more movies, each new one carrying an ever-greater amount of weight from expectations based on previous installments.

And the third episode introduces a potential technological breakthrough that could be more narrative trouble than it’s worth, since it’s more advanced than anything Picard or Sisko or Janeway got to enjoy on shows set a century later.The visual effects put past shows to shame, but the combat scenes aren’t directed with as much flair as many of the other scenes, and one character gets to protest, “We’re Starfleet. ” There are huge developments at the end of the second hour, and then the third is more or less the pilot for the show that (*), for instance).That kind of long build-up is a bad habit of a lot of current dramas — think how many Netflix shows spend their first few hours on narrative throat-clearing before getting to what the story is — but the good news here is that Fuller and everyone who succeeded him seem to recognize that even serialized episodes need structure, and each hour feels like a unit unto itself, of a type of story you may have seen on a previous (*) Some graphic gore in that sequence and Michael’s use of a Word You Can’t Say On Television — but can say on All Access — cleaves some distance from the all-ages approach the franchise has often taken.Michael’s not biologically a hybrid of two species like Spock, but she was nurtured by both.She allows her emotions to dictate her actions far more than Spock did, but when she’s being a human calculator or breaking down the logic of a scenario, she’s believable, and especially good in the third episode, when events have made her quieter and more guarded.

And the third episode introduces a potential technological breakthrough that could be more narrative trouble than it’s worth, since it’s more advanced than anything Picard or Sisko or Janeway got to enjoy on shows set a century later.

The visual effects put past shows to shame, but the combat scenes aren’t directed with as much flair as many of the other scenes, and one character gets to protest, “We’re Starfleet. ” There are huge developments at the end of the second hour, and then the third is more or less the pilot for the show that (*), for instance).

That kind of long build-up is a bad habit of a lot of current dramas — think how many Netflix shows spend their first few hours on narrative throat-clearing before getting to what the story is — but the good news here is that Fuller and everyone who succeeded him seem to recognize that even serialized episodes need structure, and each hour feels like a unit unto itself, of a type of story you may have seen on a previous (*) Some graphic gore in that sequence and Michael’s use of a Word You Can’t Say On Television — but can say on All Access — cleaves some distance from the all-ages approach the franchise has often taken.

Michael’s not biologically a hybrid of two species like Spock, but she was nurtured by both.

She allows her emotions to dictate her actions far more than Spock did, but when she’s being a human calculator or breaking down the logic of a scenario, she’s believable, and especially good in the third episode, when events have made her quieter and more guarded.

The emphasis on fighting with the Klingons also isn’t exactly inappropriate.